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2005-05-25: Human SCINT Seminar (4)
Poster Mihoko Otake  Registed 2005-12-25 22:25 (1202 hits)

Date: 2005.5.25 (Wed) 13:00-14:15
Place: General Research Building, Room 663
Speaker: Yasushi Naruse
Title: Understandings and applications of Electroencepharography
Keywords: EEG, MEG, alpha rhythm, evoked response

Affiliation: Department of Complexity Science and Engineerging
Graduate School of Frontier Sciences
Position: Graduate Student
Adviser: Ayumu Matani, Laboratory for Biological Complex Systems
Disciplines: Brain Science
Societies and Conferences: Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society, The Society of Instrument and Control Engineers, The Vision Society of Japan, The Society for Neuroscience

Bibliography: Yasushi Naruse, Understandings and applications of Electroencepharography, Human Science Integration Seminar Abstracts, No. 4, pp. 1, 2005.
(Please use this bibliography when you cite this abstract.)

Abstract:
Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have been applied to disease diagnoses and studies for neuroscience. However, some parts of generation mechanism of EEG/MEG are unknown. In the first half of this presentation, we overviewed what is known and what is unknown about EEG/MEG generation. Although the fact that postsynaptic potentials cause EEG/MEG in a single neuron was clarified, what kind of neural networks generate EEG/MEG is unknown. In the later half of the presentation, we talked about brain computer interface (BCI). BCI systems provide a new non-muscular channel for sending messages and commands to the external world. BCI systems are realized using visual evoked potentials, auditory evoked potentials, slow cortical potentials, event-related potentials, or event-related synchronizations and event-related desynchronizations of mu and beta rhythms. Present-day BCIs have maximum information transfer rates ≤ 55 bits/min. With this capacity, they can provide basic communication and control functions (e.g. environmental controls, simple word processing). In order to realize this capacity, a subject must undergo a heavy training. A BCI system with a high transfer rate and a light training is required.

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